1955 Nardi Bisiluro LeMans car

Via Road and Track:

On one side: a 55-horsepower, Giannini-tuned, BMW 750 engine. On the other:  the driver. Both were encased in slippery, streamlined pods, with a flat-facing airplane-style radiator in the middle. Built on a Fiat 500 chassis, again, it weighed a tick under 1000 pounds and reportedly churned out as much as 62 horsepower. The result is unlike any race car that ever existed. It looks like the underside of a fighter-bomber’s wing, where the driver is nothing more than a physical nuisance, bulging out and getting in the way of such aerodynamic slipperiness—in a time when aero was developed by simply, pardon the pun, “winging it.”

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1955 Nardi Bisiluro LeMans car

Renault Trezor Concept

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Via Car and Driver:

Good old-fashioned fantasy cars have become few and far between at modern-day auto shows. Indeed, most cars spinning around on turntables these days have at least some chance of production. Meanwhile, wild, imaginative, razzle-dazzle creations with four wheels and zero chances of being built have all but disappeared. But at the 2016 Paris auto show, Renault did its part to add some of that old-school excitement to its home country’s preeminent auto show with its wild, fantastical Trezor concept, a one-door, two-seat GT that’s both drop-dead gorgeous and utterly impossible, just like concept cars from the good old days.

This is not to say that the Trezor is a pointless exercise. Renault promises the Trezor’s styling paves the way for elements that will be found on future production models, namely its “warm, simple, sensual lines,” clearly defined face, and C-shaped LED light signature. The Trezor also appears as one “petal” of Renault’s Life Flower design strategy, which bases vehicles around life stages: in this case, falling in love.

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Renault Trezor Concept

Autonomous and Fully Connected BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100 Motorcycle

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Via Ars Technica:

BMW has used the slogan “efficient dynamics” for a few years now, but its designers have taken that charge quite literally in this case, with an emphasis on “dynamics.” Yes, it moves as a conventional motorcycle moves, but the frame and power unit reconfigure themselves depending on riding conditions. Although the engine is a zero-emissions power unit, it resembles the horizontally opposed “boxer” engines currently found in BMW’s motorbikes—but only on the move. When the bike parks, the power unit folds itself up like an accordion.

The black triangle frame—which is meant to evoke BMW’s first-ever bike, the 1923 R32—also bends and moves, doing away with the joints and bearings we’d see on a conventional bike. The steering is even speed-sensitive; at higher speeds, the frame becomes less flexible and more stable. The tires are also adaptive, reconfiguring themselves to optimize ride comfort and handling on the fly.

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Autonomous and Fully Connected BMW Motorrad VISION NEXT 100 Motorcycle