Diamond Nanothreads Could Support Space Elevator

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Via Space.com

The team, led by chemistry professor John Badding, applied alternating cycles of pressure to isolated, liquid-state benzene molecules and were amazed to find that rings of carbon atoms assembled into neat and orderly chains.

While they were expecting the benzene molecules to react in a disorganized way, they instead created a neat thread 20,000 times smaller than a strand of human hair but perhaps the strongest material ever made.

The Penn State University researchers immediately had a hunch that these diamond nanothreads, which are remarkably light and strong at the same time — could prove to be an ideal material for a space elevator, a long cable anchored on Earth and reaching into space to attach to a satellite in orbit.

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Diamond Nanothreads Could Support Space Elevator

Google Prototypes Star Trek Communicator

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Via Time:

Amit Singhal has at least two obsessions: search and Star Trek. The 47-year-old joined Google as its 176th employee in 2000 and has been working on search since. He’s also been spreading the gospel of Star Trek, a franchise he’s loved since his time as a boy in the mountainous region of Uttar Pradesh, India. At one point the company’s voice search project was under the codename Majel, a reference to the woman who voiced the Starship Enterprise’s AI computer.

It’s no surprise that Singhal eventually combined his two passions in the form of a prototype wearable modeled after the communicator that Captain Picard and company use to interact with the Enterprise. The Bluetooth-enabled lapel pin, which Google has never before discussed publicly, is equipped with a microphone and is activated with a simple tap. The device, which could output sound through a speaker or accompanying headphones, allows users to talk to Google without having to fish out their cell phones.

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Google Prototypes Star Trek Communicator

Marines Train with Four Legged Robot Named “Spot”

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Via the United States Marines:

Employees of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and Boston Dynamics trained Marines from the Marine Corps Warfighting Lab how to operate “Spot,” a quadruped prototype robot, at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va., Sept. 16, 2015.

Spot is a 160-pound, electrically powered, hydraulically actuated robot designed by Boston Dynamics.

“We want to continue to experiment with quadruped technology and find ways that this can be employed to enhance the Marine Corps warfighting capabilties,” said Capt. James Pineiro, the branch head for Marine Corps Warfighting Lab.

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Marines Train with Four Legged Robot Named “Spot”

Nanosubmarines Promise a Fast Drug Delivery Device

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Via IEEE Spectrum:

[James] Tour and his team have designed and fabricated a molecule consisting of 244 atoms that can move within a liquid environment using a tail-like propeller powered by ultraviolet light.

What is really impressive about the nanoscale submarines is their speed. One wag of its tail can move it 18 nanometers. Not impressed? Consider that the tail can wag a million revolutions per minute (RPM), which translates to propelling the molecule about 2.5 centimeters per second. In nano-scale terms that’s really fast.

In research published in the journal ACS Nano, the speed of the 10-nanometer scale submersibles are fast enough that they can work their way through a solution containing molecules of the same size without being slowed down.

“This is akin to a person walking across a basketball court with 1,000 people throwing basketballs at him,” Tour said in a press release.

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Nanosubmarines Promise a Fast Drug Delivery Device