Nokia announces OZO virtual reality camera

ozo

Via Nokia.com:

OZO captures stereoscopic 3D video through eight (8) synchronized global shutter sensors and spatial audio through eight (8) integrated microphones. Software built for OZO enables real-time 3D viewing, with an innovative playback solution that removes the need to pre-assemble a panoramic image ­­- a time-consuming process with solutions currently in the marketplace.

OZO’s filmed content can be published for commercially available VR viewing hardware such as head mounted displays (HMDs), with immersive, full 360-degree imaging and spatially accurate original sound. OZO also integrates into existing professional workflows and works with third-party tools, dramatically simplifying content production at all stages.

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Nokia announces OZO virtual reality camera

Getting Closer to the Metaverse

Matrix

Via International Business Times:

Virtual reality on the scale of the science fiction film The Matrix has moved into the realm of the technologically possible, according to a London startup, following the launch of a massive-scale simulation platform…

The cloud-based infrastructure is able to build simulations of everything from cities, to social networks, to entire economies. By simulating such systems, rather than simply analysing the data of existing ones, SpatialOS could conceivably predict the future. By modelling all the possible permutations of these systems it could point out issues or problems that might arise. Had the operating system been around before 2008, Naruda claims it could have perhaps even prevented the financial crisis.

For now, the applications of the technology are limited to a video game by the name of World’s Adrift. Using Spatial OS, the creators of World’s Adrift have built a virtual world the size of Wales. Within it are four million entities, which are of course both simultaneous and persistent.

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Getting Closer to the Metaverse

New tech lets users feel VR

impacto-virtual-reality

Via Boy Genius Report:

A team of researchers from the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) lab at Germany’s Hasso Plattner Institute have created working prototypes of a device they call Impacto. The device is integrated into a band that can be worn on the arm, leg or foot of a virtual reality user. When combined with a VR experience that incorporates the HCI researchers’ special software, Impacto simulates contact on the wearer so that he or she can actually feel objects virtual reality. At least, to an extent.

Examples demonstrated by the team include a boxing game where the user can actually feel the impact from blocked punches on his or her arm, and a game where the player bounces a soccer ball on his or her foot and can feel each strike.

Of note, Impacto isn’t a simple vibrate motor shoved into a plastic box. The device combines a haptic vibration engine with electrical muscle stimulation to actually create a sensation of pushing or pulling, therefore more closely mimicking the feeling of contact from actual physical objects.

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New tech lets users feel VR